CEPPA Talk (in person) – Eric Martin (Baylor)

Location: Edgecliffe G03 Title: Scientism and Humanities Education Abstract: In this talk I discuss a pedagogical implication of scientism. Because scientism elevates science and derogates what is deemed non-scientific, the arts and humanities become, on such a view, less valuable parts of university curricula. I survey some of the current data on declining study of ... Read more

CEPPA Talk (in person) – Guy Fletcher (Edinburgh)

Location: Edgecliffe G03 Title: All’s Well that Ends Well? Abstract: Distinguish how well someone’s life is going at a particular point -- their momentary well-being -- from how well their life went as a whole, their lifetime well-being. How are these related? The simplest answer is that lifetime well-being is just aggregate momentary well-being. Theories that deny this are forms of holism about lifetime ... Read more

Knox Lecture 2023 – Sally Haslanger (MIT)

Location: School III in-person and Teams online (for online attendees, headphones should be worn to prevent a feedback loop from occurring) Title: Social Reproduction and the Politics of Care Abstract: For decades, socialist feminists have insisted that an adequate approach to any economy, and especially to capitalism, must involve attention to social reproduction, i.e., to “the activities ... Read more

Special MPRG (in person) – Mark Oppenheimer (Johannesburg Bar)

Location: Edgecliffe 104 Title: Should hate speech be against the law? Abstract: Hate speech has become increasingly prevalent, fuelled by social media, political polarization, and the rise of extremist groups. It can have a profoundly negative impact on individuals and communities, causing harm, inciting violence, and perpetuating discrimination. However, hate speech is notoriously difficult to ... Read more

CEPPA Talk (online) – Frances Kamm (Rutgers)

Microsoft Teams

Location: Teams (online only) Title: Superogation Abstract: This paper considers the relation between supererogation and duties (also here referred to as obligations) from a nonconsequentialist point of view. It first considers whether supererogation may sometimes take precedence over positive and negative duties and how this relates to personal costs (including efforts) required to perform one’s duty. It then ... Read more